Overview

The following provides an introduction to Photo Batch. We will cover the following topics:

  1. Requirements
    Prerequisites to successfully complete this tutorial.
  2. Importing and previewing your photos
    Explaining how to prepare for processing your images using Photo Batch.
  3. Processing and exporting your photos
    Explaining the information and the settings present in Photo Batch and how to achieve the best results using it.

Requirements

Before starting this tutorial, make sure you have the following items available:

  • Latest version of Photo Batch
  • Mac OS X 10.6 or higher

Importing and previewing your photos

Import images to Photo Batch

Drag and drop photos in Photo Batch or even in the dock icon. The latter works even if the Photo Batch closed.

Note: Only PNG, TIFF and JPEG filetypes are supported in Photo Batch. If a folder contains any other filetypes (.txt for example), they will simply be ignored by Photo Batch.

If you dragged a folder containing a large number of files, your entire iPhoto library for instance, it is perfectly normal for opening process to take some time. So either go grab a cup of coffee or you can press the cancel button at anytime.

Note: If the opening process is cancelled, Photo Batch will keep all the images it managed to scan up to that moment.

If you imported photos that you don’t want to use in your current Photo Batch session, you can simply select them in the browser and delete them.

Tip: We strongly suggest you import similar photos in your Photo Batch session, as the settings and effects will affect all photos. For instance, you don’t want to crop your entire iPhoto Library with the same crop settings.

You can import photos from anywhere on your hard-drive, even external hard-disks and from multiple folders too. However the destination folder of the exported images will be the same.

If you import photos from multiple folders, you increase the risk of having duplicate names when exporting with Image Name option is set to “Preserve Original name”.

Photo Batch manages this situation by adding the “_1”, “_2” and so on, suffix to the other exported files having the same name, to avoid files overwriting each other.

Previewing imported images

Once that all the photos are imported, we can view each photo by selecting it in the browser.

Zoom

By default the zoom setting is at 100%, meaning that if the image is larger than Photo Batch ‘s viewing area, you will only be able to see a portion of the image.

To see the entire image, you can either use the zoom slider or simple click on the Fit Screen button, which will set the appropriate zoom value so the selected image will fit.

Actual Size

Fit to Screen

Contextual menu for the photo browser

If you right-click on an image from the photo browser, a contextual menu will appear offering some useful tools.

Get Info...

The option will open a new window displaying the metadata information of the selected image.

Reveal In Finder

This option will Reveal In Finder the right-clicked image.

Remove Image...

This option will remove from the browser the right-clicked image.

Processing and exporting your photos

The processing section of Photo Batch is divided into five categories:

  • Adjust
  • Crop
  • Rotate & scale
  • Name
  • Save

Tip: When processing with Photo Batch we suggest you import similar images for better results.

Adjust

This section enables you to adjust the brightness, contrast and saturation for all the imported images.

Crop

When cropping, you can either crop by percentage or by the amount of pixels.

If you crop by percentage, and decide to crop 10% from left, Photo Batch will crop 10% from every photo’s width. Meaning that if one photo 640 pixels wide Photo Batch will cut the first 64 pixels from the left of that picture. If another image is 1024 pixels wide Photo Batch will cut the first 102 pixels from the left of that photo and so on.

If you, however, decide to crop by pixels and you crop by 500 pixels from the top, Photo Batch will cut 500 pixels from the right of every image having a height greater than 500 pixels. So images with a height of 500 pixels or less will not be cropped, and an error dialog will appear at the end of the export process.

Rotate & scale

Rotate

You can rotate all you images by intervals of 90 degrees: 0, 90 left or right and 180.

Tip: When processing with Photo Batch we suggest you import similar images for better results.

Scale

Photo Batch offer three scaling modes:

  • by percentage
  • by pixels
  • by maximum pixels

Scaling by percentage

When scaling your photos by Percentage and you enter a 50% value for the width and a 30 % value for the height, the resulting image dimensions will be:

New Width = Original Width x 30/100
New Height = Original Height x 50/100

If the dimensions of your original image were 1600 x 1200 pixels, once we scale this image using the values describes above, the dimensions of exported image will be:

New Width = 1600 pixels x 30/100 = 480 pixels
New Height = 1200 pixels x 50/100 = 600 pixels

As we can see, we lost the aspect ratio of the original image (4:3). The resulting image being stretched.

Image scaled by percentage using the width 30% and the height 50%

Tip: To preserve the aspect ratio of the imported image when scaling by percentage, its important to set the same values for both the width and the height.

Scaling by pixels

When scaling your photos by pixels and you enter a 400 pixels value for the width and a 600 pixels value for the height, the resulting image dimensions will be:

New Width = 800 pixels
New Height = 200 pixels

If the dimensions of your original image were 1600 x 1200 pixels, once we scale this image using the values describes above, the dimensions of exported image will be 800 x 200.

As we can see, we lost the aspect ratio of the original image (4:3) in this scaling mode too. The resulting image being stretched.

Images scaled by pixels using the width 800 pixels and the height 200 pixels

Tip: To preserve the aspect ratio of the imported image when scaling by pixels, its important to set the values so that the aspect ratio is not affected.

In our example we could simply divide or multiply both the width and the height of the original photo by the same value.

For example, if we divide the dimensions of your original image (1600 x 1200 pixels) by 2 we will obtain an 800 x 600 pixels image, which has kept the aspect ration of 4:3.

Scaling by maximum pixels

When scaling your photos by Maximum Pixels and you enter a 600 pixels value for the width and a 700 pixels value for the height, the resulting image dimensions will be:

New Width = 600 pixels
New Height = 450 pixels

If the dimensions of your original image were 1600 x 1200 pixels, once we scale this image using the values describes above, the dimensions of exported image will be 600 x 450.

Images scaled by Maximum Pixels using the width 600 pixels and the height 700 pixels

Scaling by Maximum Pixels is the only scaling mode that keeps the original aspect ratio of you image.

The algorithm will not allow your photo’s width to exceed 600 and its height to exceed 700. So for an image with a 4:3 aspect ratio to fit in a 600 x 700 frame, its optimum size should be 600 x 450.

Name

Target Folder

By default all your imported photos, no matter their original path, will be saved in Pictures/Photo Batch/Export_YYYY-MM-DD (YYYY-MM-DD represents todays date).

You can change the Target Folder’s name as long as it is accepted by OS X. To change it’s destination simply refer to the Save - Destination section bellow.

Images Name

By default your exported photos will be named by Photo Batch “Image_01” to “Image_. For example if you have 29 photos imported your images will be names “Image_01” to “Image_29”.

Note: You can also name your images “Image_1” (instead of “Image_01”) by choosing the proper suffix (see the option Append Suffix bellow).

You can always keep the original name of the image (the name of the imported file) by choosing the Preserve Original option. To avoid overwriting files the same name from different locations, Photo Batch will append a suffix (“_1”, “_2” and so on) to the upcoming exported files having the same name. Meaning if you have two images named “Vacation.jpeg”, which come from different locations (folders), and the Preserve Original option is selected, the exported files will be named “Vacation.jpeg” and “Vacation_1.jpeg”.

Save

File type

Photo Batch enables you to save all of your imported pictures to several popular formats: JPEG, PNG and TIFF.

If you select one of the three formats from above, Photo Batch will save all images using the specified format, no matter the format of the imported photo.

Note: To preserve the format of the imported image select the option Original File Type.

Metadata

By checking the option Metadata, Photo Batch will attach the metadata of the original photo to the exported one.

Note: If, for example, you changed the one of the Adjust effects, Photo Batch will preserve the metadata of the original image and therefore will not recalculate the exposure time according to your adjustments.

Destination

When saved all of your files will be located by default in “/Users/You_User_Name/Pictures/Photo Batch/Target_Folder_Name”, if you wish to change the destination your saved images, simply use the Choose... and choose the a new one.

Note: If you are using the Mac App Store version of Photo Batch, the destination will be reset to the default value every time you quit Photo Batch. This is caused by the app being sandboxed.